Latest projects: August 2015

Magazine editing and layout

I’m the editor of Richmond Yacht Club’s quarterly magazine, and do all the layout work as well as editing the content and writing some articles.

Plain-Sailing-Aug15-cover-web

Magazine editing and layout by Cornelia Luethi.

 

You can download and read ‘Plain Sailing’ magazine in PDF format from http://richmondyc.org.nz/social/plain-sailing/

Website article writing

How to get your tenant to say “yes” every time – an article for a property manager.

Contractor & tenant negotiation: ask for what you want! – some handy tips for landlord and home owners from my property manager client.

Keyword research and research strategy

There have been lots and lots and lots of keyword research and keyword strategy projects recently! All for new website copywriting jobs I’m working on.

The clients I’m working with are in a range of industries, including an overseas company that manufactures consumer durables; as well as a locally-based trades business, and a business-to-business service.

Cornelia has been working on keyword research and keyword strategy projects for a number of clients in different industries.

Cornelia has been working on keyword research and keyword strategy projects for a number of clients in different industries.

Website proofreading and online updates

I have just finished proofreading all 100 or so pages of the Carter Holt Harvey Woodproducts New Zealand website. I also made any of the required edits in the CMS of the website on behalf of my client.

Email newsletter editing and layout in MailChimp

I work on lots of email newsletters each month, this is just one of them. The client is a yoga and holistic fitness business.

Jul15-Evolve-newsletter

Email newsletter editing and layout by Cornelia Luethi – using MailChimp.

 

Social media graphics

Here are some Facebook graphics I made for my beauty therapy client. (This service is exclusively for monthly retainer clients.)

Phytostat-offer

 

aspect-peels

Would you like Cornelia to write something for you?

Contact me and tell me a bit about your project.

Contact Cornelia for help with your copywriting projects →

Latest projects: May 2015

It’s been a busy few months! Here’s what I’ve been working on for my clients:

Magazine editing, photography and layout

I’m the editor of Richmond Yacht Club’s quarterly magazine. As well as editing the content, I also do all the layout work – as well as shooting photos for the mag.

PlainSailing-May15-cover


Magazine editing, cover photo, and layout work – all done by Cornelia Luethi.

 

Love this gorgeous cover photo (shot by yours truly), taken on a Wednesday Night Race on Auckland Harbour.

You can download and read ‘Plain Sailing’ magazine in PDF format from http://richmondyc.org.nz/social/plain-sailing/

Website project management

Wine Technology website


Cornelia Luethi project managed this e-commerce directory website.

 

A client needed a new website, but didn’t know what they wanted or what they needed.

So I project managed the whole thing, making it an easy, straightforward experience for my client.

Thanks to Quokka Creative‘s web wizardry, NZ Wine Technology now has a fab new website and online directory with e-commerece system.

Website article writing

Wine technology articles – the new website I’d project managed for NZ Wine Technology needed some SEO articles. Here’s what I researched and wrote:

Property management articles – these are working really well for my client in terms of SEO and also converting readers into prospects and clients:

Print magazine article

The editor of NZ Wine Technology magazine was so impressed with the articles I wrote for his new website, that he combined some of them and published them in the print magazine.

The editor of NZ Wine Technology magazine was so impressed with the articles I wrote for his new website, that he combined some of them and published them in the print magazine.

 

As a website copywriting specialist, it’s rare for my work to make it into print. But it just happened!

The editor of NZ Wine Technology magazine was so impressed with the articles I wrote for his new website, that he combined some of them and published them in the print magazine.

The orginal articles are here: http://winetechnology.co.nz/resources/

Email newsletter editing and set up in MailChimp

I edit and set up lots of email newsletters each month, this is just a small selection of what I’ve done this quarter:

2015-newsletters2

This is a selection of the newsletters I edited and set up in MailChimp. They’re all for the same client – a publishing and media business.

 

Social media graphics

Here are some Facebook graphics I made for my beauty therapy client. (This service is exclusively for monthly retainer clients.)

HappyMothersDay-500

 

facial-massage

Would you like Cornelia to write something for you?

Contact me and tell me a bit about your project.

Contact Cornelia to see if she can help with your copywriting projects →

Latest projects: February 2015

Happy (belated) new year! I’ve been working through the holidays on lots of exciting new projects…

Magazine editing and layout

As the editor of Richmond Yacht Club’s quarterly magazine, I do all the layout work – as well as editing articles and contributions.

Magazine editing and layout by Cornelia Luethi.

Magazine editing and layout by Cornelia Luethi.

 

You can download and read ‘Plain Sailing’ magazine in PDF format from http://richmondyc.org.nz/social/plain-sailing/

Website article writing

Property management articles – these are working really well for my client in terms of SEO and also converting readers into prospects and clients:

Recruitment and HR:

Website design, copywriting and photography

Website design, copywriting and photography by Cornelia Luethi.

Website design, copywriting and photography by Cornelia Luethi.

 

Just launched: a brand new website for Peninsula Marine Services – made by me (www.WebsitesByCornelia.co.nz). If you’re in Auckland and you need new dock lines, superyacht mooring lines, winch servicing or any kind of marine project management, give Kevin a call.

Details of my website design, copywriting and photography service are here.

Website project management

These websites were actually launched last year, but as I haven’t mentioned them here before, here they are now!

Both websites have complex functionality in terms of the directory listings system, and the subscription system (both of which are e-commerce enabled). The websites are fully responsive and were created by the talented Trisha Cupra at Quokka Creative.

My role was to project manage the site, which included:

  • Scoping the requirements of the new website.
  • Ensuring that existing content from the legacy websites were transferred over.
  • Scope and set up the SEO of the new websites.
  • Develop and implement online advertising options, and creating an online media kit with ad specifications etc.
  • Test the new websites.
  • Launch the websites internally, including training staff on how it all works. This included face-to-face training; writing training notes; and creating video screencasts.
  • Launch the websites to my client’s customers via email, informing them of the new features and functions.
  • Ensuring the sites were delivered on time and to budget.

The new websites have proven to be very profitable for my client; the new sites paid for themselves within a few months of launching.

Website project management by Cornelia Luethi.

Website project management by Cornelia Luethi.

 

Website project management by Cornelia Luethi.

Website project management by Cornelia Luethi.

 

Website audits

A corporate client liked the initial website audit I did so much, that they ordered 2 more for their other websites!

All 3 website audits contained a Website Effectiveness Report (where I look at SEO and conversion factors), as well as a Statistics Summary Report (a plain English review of what’s happening in Google Analytics).

website-effectiveness-reports-3

 

Email newsletter copywriting and set-up in MadMimi

I work on lots of email newsletters each month, here’s one of the nicest looking ones I’ve done recently. I wrote the content, created the graphics, created the layout, and set it up for sending.

Jan15-Rubywaxx-newsletter

Newsletter copywriting, layout and graphics by Cornelia Luethi. This newsletter uses MadMimi.

 

Would you like Cornelia to write something for you?

Contact me and tell me a bit about your project.

Contact Cornelia for help with your copywriting projects →

New (shorter) Google character limits for Page Title and Meta Description tags

In short: Google has changed the number of characters it displays for your Page Title and Meta Description in your search results.

Introducing new (shorter) Google character limits for Page Title and Meta Description tags.

Introducing new (shorter) Google character limits for Page Title and Meta Description tags.

The old Google character limits were:

70 characters for Page Title tag, and 150 characters for Meta Description.

The new limits are:

50 to 55 characters for Page Title tag, and 115 characters for the Meta Description.

Why worry about these new limits?

If you don’t shorten your meta data, your search engine listings risk looking incomplete – or worst case scenario, looking like complete gibberish. This is very likely to hurt the click-through rate to your website.

Let’s look at an example:

The Page Title for the home page of this website used to be as follows (and this was previously displayed in full on Google):

Writing service: Words By Cornelia is all about helping you sell more!

But now, the end of the sentence gets cut off and replaced with “…”:

Google-character-limit-page-title-tag

Eh?! “Words By Cornelia is all about helping you dot-dot-dot”? That doesn’t make much sense! An important part of my message (helping you sell more) has been rudely cut off!

And that’s not all – the Meta Description is getting truncated too – especially on mobile devices.

For example, here’s how the Google listing for my website copy page looks when viewed on Google on a desktop computer:

Google-character-limit-meta-description

But here’s how the same search result looks on my iPhone:

Google-character-limit-meta-description-iphone

Ugh, that’s not what I want! (So yes, I’ll be re-writing my own meta data, page by page, to get rid of the dot-dot-dots, and get my message across the way I want it.)

But why did Google make this change to character limits? And when?

Google most likely made the change to provide a better experience for people using their phones for search. After all, people are increasingly accessing the internet from smart phones.

This change started appearing around May 2014 , so even if your website went live or got updated quite recently, you will be affected by this change.

If beforehand you had a nice, catchy headline showing, it won’t be so catchy if there’s a bunch of dot-dot-dots!

Are these new Google character limits set in stone?

Nope, nothing with Google is permanent or set in stone.

And as you can see, there are variations from the desktop search experience to what you see on your smart phone – even with these changes.

But I definitely think it’s wise to embrace these shorter character limits. Any website copy I write for new clients will include meta data with these shorter character limits (and I’m contact existing clients to let them know if these changes to see what they’d like to do).

After all, website useage on mobile devices is on the rise all over the world, and it’s best practice to give users the best possible online experience.

What you need to do:

You need to review your existing meta data and make sure it’s working as hard for you as possible. After all, a bunch of dot-dot-dots isn’t going to compel Google users to click through to your site. Your meta data needs to be short, keyworded and punchy.

Also, make sure that any new pages (and also blog articles) stick to the new character limits.

Further reading

Here are some helpful articles on this topic: New Title Tag and Meta Description Character Lengths and New Title Tag Guidelines & Preview Tool from The Moz Blog.

 


Next step: Do you want help with writing Meta Data – or other website copy?

I’d love to help you with your website copy! You can see the kind of results I’ve achieved for my clients, and also get an idea of my pricing… and if that sounds like the level of attention and service you’re after, please contact me and tell me a bit about what you need. 🙂

 

 

What is duplicate content? A simple guide for website owners who don’t want to lose their Google rankings

What is duplicate content? Here's a simple guide for website owners who don’t want to lose their Google rankings.

What is duplicate content? Here’s a simple guide for website owners who don’t want to lose their Google rankings.

Remember your schooldays?

All that homework – man that was a chore! Let’s face it, it was just so much more fun to spend your afternoons playing with your buddies than slaving over books and numbers and essays. Ugh!

Worst of all was studying for tests.

Perhaps you didn’t want to cram for the test, or you simply forgot about it.

And then, to try and save the humiliation of a Fail, you tried to copy the answers off the brainbox you’d cunningly sat next to in the exam room.

Except, of course, the teacher noticed what you’re up to, and you got a far greater humiliation than the Fail. Perhaps you were made an example of, or made to stand out in the corridor. Or you had to see the scary Headmaster. And, of course, your parents would be notified – horrors!

You soon learned that copying other kids’ work wasn’t in your best interests.

The same lesson about copying relates to your website

When it comes to your website, copying other people’s content is also a bad idea.

While there’s no teacher to punish you, instead there’s Google. (And a punishment from Google, be it a down-graded ranking or total black-listing, is a lot harder and more difficult to recover than even your teacher’s worst punishment.)

Why does Google punish you for copying?

Let’s look at copying content from Google’s point of view.

The bottom line is that Google wants to give its users a good search experience. And a good search experience means that people can quickly and easily find the information they’re looking for. Google also wants the information you find to be helpful and meaningful.

Website content that’s helpful and meaningful is usually unique: it is a bespoke, one-off article that someone has researched and written.

Conversely, low quality content is not so desirable. And over the years, some website owners have tried to “cheat” the Google ranking system by copying other people’s content. And if the internet is full of copies of people’s work, it all gets a bit tedious, spammy and not a very nice or exciting place to be.

Google hates spammy websites. And it hates spammy webmasters who copy content from other people. Google would much rather point to the original source of material – and penalise those who try to copy it. These penalties come in the form of downgrading the rankings of those sites with copied content, or, worse still, removing a website from its search results altogether.

So what is duplicate content, exactly?

You get the general idea that duplicate content is not a good thing, but defining “what is duplicate content” exactly is a little trickier.

If you refer to Google’s official advice, there are some tips there (albeit quite technical), but it’s still not crystal clear. So let me explain some of the more common duplicate content problems in practical terms.

Before I cover common duplicate content problems, one thing you need to be aware of is that duplicate content doesn’t just apply from one website to another, but it also applies to pages on your own website.

The reason for this is that some spammy webmasters create dozens of pages on the same topic, to try and artificially increase their Google rankings. That doesn’t work any more, because of Google’s dislike of duplicate content.

Does Google say what percentage they consider duplicate content?

There are a number of online tools, such as Page Similarity Check Tools, where you put in two website addresses (URLs) and it tells you how similar the pages are as a percentage.

The problem is that Google doesn’t give a percentage in their guidelines, so these online tools aren’t a whole lot of use!

Rather than worry about percentages and other technicalities, here are some practical suggestions on how you can avoid common duplicate content problems.

Common duplicate content problems – and how to avoid them

On a practical level you need to be very careful with the following types of duplicate content:

  • Mobile versions of your website that have the same content twice. The solution here is for your webmaster to use the ‘noindex’ meta tag so that the duplicated pages aren’t indexed. (Or better still, build your website so that it’s mobile responsive, and doesn’t need recreating for handheld devices.)
  • Printer-only versions of web pages. The printer pages should have the ‘noindex’ tag applied so that these duplicated pages aren’t indexed.
  • Similar content that appears across a number of pages. The solution here is to make the copy, order of information and other content as different as possible.
  • On e-commerce sites, avoid using the manufacturer’s generic blurb. Chances are that every other re-seller is using the exact same copy, so be unique and write your own product descriptions.
  • Syndicate articles carefully. Some people think they’re doing you a favour by ‘promoting’ you on their website by repeating an article. Wrong! Their site could get penalised for duplicate content – but so could yours, if Google hasn’t indexed you as being the original source. The way round this is for the other site to use the ‘noindex’ tag, and to include a link back to your original article. So you can syndicate articles, but do it carefully… and if the other website owner doesn’t know what a ‘noindex’ tag is, or they’re not willing to apply it, then don’t do it. (Note: A bigger problem is that some spammy webmasters use ‘scrapers’ to steal content without your permission. If that happens, you can ask Google to remove the scraped content from their search results.)
  • Avoid cheap copywriters. Not all copywriters create unique content; and if you’re buying an article for $5 from someone in India, there’s a good chance that they might have copied someone else’s work. Or they’ve taken someone else’s work, and then put it through a ‘spinner’ which is an automatic software tool that rewrites content. And yep, Google hates ‘spun’ content! If you use a quality copywriter, the content will not only be unique, but it will reflect your tone of voice; demonstrate your company’s expertise; and compel readers to buy from you or otherwise take action.

Those are some of the main duplicate content issues I’ve come up against. There are others, too (as listed in the Google article I linked to) but they are there for your web developer to action, rather than a copywriting issue.

Ask your website developer to help you

The best advice I can give you is to focus on creating unique content, and that your website developer does their part in the programming. Go through the list of action points in Google’s article point by point.

Don’t assume that your web developer knows all this stuff, or will automatically do it: I’ve come across numerous web developers who have never heard of 301 redirects, or will only do them for an extra fee.

Remember that it’s YOUR website and your business at stake, so you have every right to ask questions of your suppliers.

If you play nicely, you should be fine

Just like schoolteachers punish only the naughty kids, Google only intends to punish those website owners who deliberately engage in deceptive practices. Google doesn’t like people who try to cheat the system and take shortcuts; they’ll be punished, sooner or later.

So if you focus on creating unique, high quality content for your website (and have a web developer on side who’s clued up in this area), you should be absolutely fine. (And if the worst does happen, and your site gets blacklisted by Google, you can submit your site for reconsideration.)

Summary

Here are some of the steps you can take so that your website doesn’t suffer from problems with duplicate content:

  • If there is a separate mobile version of your website, ensure that the ‘noindex’ tag is used for them.
  • If your website has printer-only pages, use the ‘noindex’ tag for them.
  • Avoid using similar content across a number of pages.
  • On e-commerce sites, avoid using the manufacturer’s generic blurb and write your own.
  • Syndicate articles carefully, and get the other website to use a ‘noindex’ tag, and also link back to your original article.
  • Avoid cheap copywriters who might steal or ‘spin’ content.
  • Ask your web developer which steps they’ve taken to avoid duplicate content issues. Go through the Google article with them as a starting point.
  • Focus on creating unique, high quality content for your website.

Need unique copy for your website? Contact Cornelia today →

Does it keep falling off?

Does copywriting and marketing keep falling of your To Do list? Then let Cornelia take care of it for you.

Does copywriting and marketing keep falling off your To Do list? Then let Cornelia take care of it for you.

Does copywriting and marketing keep “falling” off your To Do list?

Goodness, the first two months of 2014 have gone already and it’s officially Autumn in this part of the world (or “Fall”, as our American friends call it).

Did you have any copywriting and marketing projects planned this year?

But have those tasks “fall”-en off your To Do list already?

Then let me help you!

Stop struggling with your writing and marketing projects, I’ll make it a breeze to create unique messages for your business:

  • Website content: Web pages, news articles and blog posts that the search engines will love.
  • Email content: Newsletters, autoresponders and sales emails to keep your customers and prospects engaged and informed.
  • Ebook writing: Want to give your customers and prospects a Free White Paper or eBook? They’re a great way to add value and demonstrate you’re the best in your industry.
  • Video scripts: Video is the latest and greatest online marketing trend… I can write compelling scripts for intro videos, how-to videos, and sales videos.

How to get started…

Just tell me a bit about what you have in mind and we can take it from there. 🙂

I’m looking forward to hearing from you!

Cornelia

Cornelia Luethi BSc (Hons), DipM

Contact Cornelia for copywriting help →

Online video marketing: How long should your video be?

How long should a video be for online video marketing? The facts may surprise you!

How long should a video be for online video marketing? The facts may surprise you!

It’s amazing how often people with no experience in a matter will have strong opinions on a topic.

Online video marketing is one of those topics.

Everyone seems to be an expert in how long a video should be – but that opinion is more likely to be based on that particular individual’s attention span, than on any hard evidence.

Me, I like facts… and using facts as a basis for decision making can be a lot more beneficial than listening to someone’s opinion.

Facts on video length for online video marketing

The guys and gals at Wistia, a video marketing platform, have compiled data based on the thousands of videos they host. This covers all different types of videos:

Wistia

Source: http://wistia.com/blog/does-length-matter-it-does-for-video-2k12-edition/

Key learnings about video length for web videos

Here are the key learnings from Wistia’s data – and I’ve added my own pointers to these:

  • Surprisingly few people will watch your video to the end – even if it’s short.
    Cornelia’s takeaway: Don’t get too hung up on the drop-off rate; not everyone is going to be interested in your message. And not everyone is going to be a potential customer.
  • The drop-off is quite steep till the 2 minute mark, then it flattens out.
    Cornelia’s takeaway: Lots of people have low attention spans. In my business, I do best with clients who have reasonable attention spans, so I don’t even bother going after the short-attention-span market. Think: What kind of person are you targeting?
  • The difference in engagement for a 2-3 minute video is about the same as for a 4-5 minute video.
    Cornelia’s takeaway: Don’t get too hung up if your video is 2 minutes or 5 minutes, it really doesn’t matter that much. (And people who say it does matter don’t know what they’re talking about.) The main thing is that your content/script is well-paced and engaging. Videos (just like movies) only drag if the script and plot aren’t paced very well.
  • 20-30% of people will watch a long video of 3- to 60+ minutes
    Cornelia’s takeaway: People do watch long videos – if the content is interesting to them!
  • The drop-off rate for 45-60 minute videos is about the same as videos of over an hour in duration.
    Cornelia’s takeaway: Again, people do watch long videos – your job is to ensure that the content is interesting and presented at an appropriate pace.

Conclusions

The data above is helpful to some extent when planning a video. But the main thing is that the script is paced in such a way to keep people engaged.

That means that the web video shouldn’t be slow and drag… or people will yawn and start looking at the time – and closing their browser.

Similarly, don’t try and go to fast to ‘lose’ your viewers. If they can’t keep up with what you’re saying, they’ll give up and look elsewhere.

Above all, your video should geared to achieving a specific strategy, so you can measure your performance. You can read about some of the different video marketing strategies here.

 

 

Newsflash! Copywriter for the Best Small Business of the Year

My client, Keola Homes, with the Business of the Year Award (plus a trophy for being a Finalist for Excellence in Innovation).

My client, Keola Homes, with the Business of the Year Award (plus a trophy for being a Finalist for Excellence in Innovation).

Last week a copywriting and marketing consulting client of mine won Small Business of the Year in the Westpac Auckland West Business Awards. These Awards are a big deal in this part of the world, and there was strong competition from more than 100 businesses in all industry sectors.

Yours truly was the writer of the winning award entry. 🙂

My award-winning client is Keola Homes, a 4-person small business that specialises in designing and building luxury architectural houses on difficult plots of land.

I am proud to be the copywriter and marketing consultant for the Small Business of the Year!

I’ve been working with Keola Homes on a monthly retainer basis since May 2012. I’ve worked on various projects with Keola Homes during that time:

  • Writing this winning Award entry for Small Business of the Year (plus they were Finalists for Excellence in Innovation).
  • Writing a previous Award entry, where Keola Homes won Bronze for a Commercial Project.
  • SEO website copywriting: the Keola Homes website now generating more website traffic, and more conversions. 42% of sales have come from the website in the past year (compared to next-to-nothing before that).

Here’s what Sanjesh Lal, owner of Keola Homes, says about my award writing work:

Sanjesh Lal, Keola Homes

Sanjesh Lal, Keola Homes Ltd

“Cornelia has been instrumental in preparing applications for 2 prestigious awards this year for us: The NZ Commercial Project Awards and Westpac Small Business of the Year. We are proud to have won both awards!

There was a lot of data for Cornelia to sift through, and she created meaningful applications backed up by firm statistical data.

Cornelia has used her skills in copywriting and good clear graphical representation of data to create award winning entries both times.

She has presented our ‘story’ in such an amazing and credible way, that judges have found us worthy of awards. I could not have done even half as good a job myself.” – Sanjesh Lal, Keola Homes Ltd

Quality results

When it comes to copywriting, I’m not the cheapest person out there (nor the most expensive), but the writing work is high quality and geared to helping you achieve your business goals.

More details about my copywriting services are here:

Availability of copywriting services

So if you have any projects you’d like award-winning copywriting and marketing for, I’d suggest you contact me soon. I take on new clients on a strictly first-come, first-served basis, and there is often a waiting list of a month or two.

Cornelia Luethi has a strong track record in award entry writing.

Cornelia Luethi has a strong track record in award entry writing.

Next step:

Simply tell me a bit about the project you’d like help with. You can use the easy-peasy form here, and that’ll get the conversation started:

http://wordsbycornelia.com/contact

And if you have any questions, just ask!

Cornelia

Cornelia Luethi  BSc (Hons) DipM
Copywriter and marketing consultant, Auckland, NZ

Bye bye Google Keyword Tool – and hello Keyword Planner

Yes, Google has now retired its Keyword Tool has gone… in its place is the new Keyword Planner.

And if you’re anything like me, you went ‘ugh’ when you saw the interface

Let’s just say that the interface of the Keyword Planner isn’t exactly intuitive.

After all, it’s designed primarily for Google AdWords advertisers, and it has a bunch of features you don’t even need to touch for SEO keyword research!

Luckily for you, I braved it and have written step-by-step instructions (and made a step-by-step screencast video) on how to use the new Google Keyword Planner for organic SEO keyword research:

 
 
 
How to master the Google Keyword Planner for organic SEO keyword research – quickly and easily.

How to master the Google Keyword Planner for organic SEO keyword research – quickly and easily.

The Keyword Research eBook is written by me, Cornelia Luethi, a specialist SEO website copywriter.

In ‘Keyword Research: How to use the Google Keyword Planner for SEO: a step-by-step guide’ you’ll discover the technique that I use when creating SEO website content for my copywriting clients.

The Keyword Research book covers:

  1. The brainstorming process, to generate keyword ideas. Time spent on this yields better results, or you could miss out on some important keywords.
  2. How to use the Google Keyword Planner: step-by-step instructions with screenshots.
  3. How to format the data in Excel. You may end up with thousands of keywords, some of which will be duplicated or irrelevant. Find out how to deal with them!
  4. Formulating a keyword strategy: Now that you’ve got the data, you need to make some sense of it. I cover my keyword strategy techniques, including how I use keywords in SEO website copywriting.

Training

 

Get up-and-running with Google’s Keyword Planner in minutes, with Cornelia Luethi’s training.

Get up-and-running with Google’s Keyword Planner in minutes, with Cornelia Luethi’s training.

Cornelia

Cornelia Luethi  BSc (Hons), DipM
Copywriter, marketing consultant and author of Keyword Research

PS. There’s a 60-day money-back guarantee!

You can evaluate the Keyword Research eBook risk-free to see if it’s right for you.

See details and buy online.

 

Time management tips from Cornelia

Hi there,

Here are a couple of videos I recorded with time management tips.

The videos are for my other website (The Leaky Bathtub, which is for DIY small business marketing) – I hope you enjoy them too!

Why you need to take time out from your business

 
 
 
FREE Marketing Tips:  http://theleakybathtub.com/marketing-tips/

How to get more stuff done (without working longer hours)

 
 
 
FREE Marketing Tips:  http://theleakybathtub.com/marketing-tips/

PS. Yes, this is me, Cornelia, in the video!

This video is filmed on my iPhone using techniques learned from iPhone Video Hero… you can get a FREE eBook on iPhone Video Marketing here.

(And if you’re wondering about my other website, The Leaky Bathtub is for business owners who want to DIY their marketing… whereas this website, Words By Cornelia, is about my copywriting service.)

PPS. Subscribe to my YouTube Channel!

 Like my videos? Please subscribe to my YouTube Channel… it’s free!

How to choose eye-catching photos for your marketing

When you’re choosing photographs to go with your copy, you need to think carefully about where you’re directing your readers’ eyeballs.

Discover why the Mona Lisa Effect is a no-no for most marketing photography, and why a Non Mona Lisa image will help your message to get across more effectively.

 
 
 
(Yes, this is me, Cornelia Luethi in the video, and here’s the link to the FREE Marketing Tips: http://theleakybathtub.com/marketing-tips/)

When you’re choosing a marketing photograph, there are 3 things you should look for:

  1. How to choose eye-catching marketing photographsThe Marketing photograph should be aspirational. You know, something positive and inspiring, so it has an “I want that” factor.
  2. Get a photograph with a person if you can. People are far more drawn to photographs of people than of objects.
  3. Pay very careful attention to where the person in the photograph is looking. Readers will follow the model’s gaze.
  4. Add a strong headline into the copy space.

Those 4 steps will make your marketing message more prominent and get more attention.

 

Update on SEO copywriting strategy – from Matt Cutts at Google

Here's the latest update on SEO copywriting strategy from Google.

Here’s the latest update on SEO copywriting strategy from Google.

In my geeky world, updates on SEO copywriting strategy are big news.

After all, Google is constantly tweaking its algorithms… Yet at the same time, my goal is to write website copy that’ll give my clients good results not just now, but in years to come.

I don’t believe in looking for Google’s loopholes (known as using ‘black hat’ SEO copywriting strategies), I’d rather focus on techniques that’ll give enduring results.

For that reason, I’ve always focused on writing content that’s good for human readers first and foremast, rather than doing weird and wonderful things with keywords.

And the good news is that writing reader-friendly content is officially the right thing to do!

In her excellent article Matt Cutts Reveals Google’s Updated SEO Copywriting Strategy, Karon Thackston shares some excellent tips on SEO copywriting strategy that she learned from an email conversation with Matt Cutts.

Who is Matt Cutts?

Matt Cutts is a Google employee, who works with the Search Quality team on search engine optimization issues. He is currently the head of Google’s Webspam team, and he’s the one who kinda lets the world at large know what Google is up to with algorithm updates.

So any SEO copywriting strategies and tactics from Matt Cutts is like hearing it all directly from the proverbial horse’s mouth. 🙂

What does Matt Cutts say about SEO copywriting strategy?

The key takeaway for me from Karon Thackston’s article is that you don’t need to use all the words in a keyphrase together. This is good news if you’ve been struggling to write website copy with ‘unnatural’ keywords.

Let me explain with an example…

Say that you’ve identified “widget repair Auckland” as a keyword that you want to target.

Till now, many of us have struggled to write website copy that sounds natural with a keyword like that: “widget repair Auckland” just isn’t something we’d say or write!

Well, what Matt Cutts has said is that we don’t need to cram the words in they keyphrase together: the words can be sprinkled around your web page.

Yep, you can use “widget” and “repair” and “Auckland” separately… or put it in a natural-sounding phrase, like “widget repair in Auckland”, or something like that.

(I’ve had a hunch for a while that Google is smart enough to figure this out, but it’s great to hear it confirmed from The Guy That Knows.)

And there’s more good news…

Google now has synonym technology. (A synonym being a word with the same, or similar, meaning.) This means that search results can bring up web pages that use related search terms, whereas previously only exact matches were revealed.

(Using the example above for a web page optimised with “widget repair Auckland”, your page could also get found for searches with “widget repair service” or “Auckland widget repairs”, etc.)

Caution: Matt Cutts said to Karon Thackston:

“Keyphrases don’t have to be in their original form. We do a lot of synonym work so that we can find good pages that don’t happen to use the same words as the user typed.

In general, though, if the words are on the web page (not in a spammy way, of course), that makes our job easier because we don’t have to rely on synonym matches to find good documents.”

In other words: don’t rely too much on the synonym technology!

Optimise for more than one keyword per page

What you can do is optimise for more than one keyword per page. (I’ve always incorporated secondary keywords into client copy, which is why my copywriting customers get enduring results.)

Again, I’d advise some caution here: if you use too many keywords, Google could penalise you for “keyword stuffing”… after all, cramming too many keywords onto a page reads unnaturally and looks spammy. So focus on writing high-quality, reader-friendly content first and foremost.

Summary

Focus on writing website content that’s appealing to human readers (and don’t worry too much about the latest SEO fads).