How to get your prospects to take action

Do you ever wish that your prospects were a little more… obedient?

That they took the action you want them to take?

The trick is to treat them like dogs… all is explained in this video!

FREE Marketing Tips: http://wordsbycornelia.com/marketing-tips/

Do you ever wish that your prospects and customers were a little more obedient?

Do you wish that more of your customers and prospects took the action you suggest in your emails, website pages, letters and brochures?

The trick to getting your customers to be more obedient is to treat them like dogs…

It's not just dogs that don't understand negative commands - neither do your prospects.

It’s not just dogs that don’t understand negative commands – neither do your prospects.

Let me explain…

Imagine that I’m telling my dog to “not sit”.

What do you think my dog, Minnie, would do?

Why, she sits down, of course!

Minnie, didn’t hear the word “don’t”… she only heard the word “sit”.

Humans are much the same…

Although we may hear negative words, such as “not” or “do not” or “don’t”; our brain picks up on the main word in the sentence. So the negative word affects our ability to communicate clearly.

Let’s have a look at some examples to show what I mean.

Here are some common things that I’ve seen business owners write in their marketing:

Here’s a classic example: “Don’t hesitate to contact us.”

Now let’s look at that again…

The message that sticks in my brain is: “Hesitate to contact us.”

Or what about: “Don’t forget to sign up.”

Ugh, the word that I’m hearing is “forget”! Of course I’ll forget, my To Do list is long enough!

Or: “It’s not a problem.”

Oh dear, all I’m hearing is: “Problem!”

Have you used negative phrases like that in your marketing and business communications?

Here’s a better way… instead of writing: “Don’t hesitate to contact us”, write, “Please get in touch”.

Doesn’t that sound a lot friendlier?

Instead of: “Don’t forget to sign up”, write, “Remember to sign up”.

And instead of: “It’s not a problem”, write, “It’s a pleasure”.

Do you see how those small changes make your business seem far more friendly, approachable and positive?

It’s such a small thing, but it really makes a difference.

Go on, give it a try next time you write some marketing copy.

Then have a look at your existing marketing materials – printed and online.

Zap those negatives and replace them with the positive actions you want your readers to take.

That way, you’ll get more customers and prospects taking the action you want them to take… and you’ll get to earn more, um, dog biscuits.

Talking of earning dog biscuits, notice how this is a small tweak you can make to your marketing that is absolutely free to make?

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How to write a Contact Us page (that actually makes it enticing for prospects to contact you!)

It's vital that your website's Contact Us page makes it easy and enticing for prospects to contact you.

It’s vital that your website’s Contact Us page makes it easy and enticing for prospects to contact you.

What action would you like your readers to take when they look at your website?

Do you want prospects to contact you? Perhaps to make an appointment, or to request a quote?

Some kind of “Contact Us” message is the main call-to-action on most brochure-style websites. So hopefully you’ve got calls-to-action sprinkled throughout your site. (And ideally in a way that’ll appeal to both Decisive Dan and also Tentative Tom readers.)

But what happens when people visit your Contact Us page?

Is your Contact Us page carefully crafted to sound friendly and inviting?

Or is it a page that you quickly threw together to get it off your To Do list as fast as possible? (After all, how hard can it be to write a good Contact Us page?!)

It’s kind of ironic that the most important page on a website is usually written without much thought…

It doesn’t make sense when you stop to think about it, does it? If “Contact Us” is the primary call-to-action on your website, then you need to put a bit of effort in when you write a Contact Us page.

Here’s a checklist of things you should include when you write a Contact Us page:

1. Friendly introductory blurb

Don’t just go straight to the nitty-gritty contact details, as that can come across as being rather abrupt.

Instead, add a sentence or two right at the beginning of your Contact Us page that makes your company sound friendly and approachable.

2. Email address

Even if your website has an enquiry form, you should always always include an email address as well. Read my article to find out why you should include an email address.

3. Contact form

You should be aware that lots of people (a) hate filling out forms, and (b) have filled out forms, only to never hear from the company they’ve contacted. So treat contact forms with caution.

To make contact forms more user friendly:

  • ALWAYS specify how quickly you’ll respond to enquiries. Will it be within 24 hours? Or 1 to 2 business days? Tell the reader! Also tell them what to do if they don’t hear back within that time frame.This is really important. Contact Forms aren’t perfect. By adding this blurb, the keenest prospects will get back in touch with you. (This happened to me just last week!)
  • NEVER use CAPTCHA – you know, those awful codes you have to input to prove that you’re not a robot or a spammer. Most of them are totally illegible and incredibly frustrating. Read my rant about CAPTCHA – which includes a far better (and totally unobtrusive, human-friendly) solution.

4. Physical and postal addresses

Putting an address on your website is vital for building trust, as it shows that you are a real, actual business.

Now, here in New Zealand things are a bit quirky in that many businesses get their mail delivered to a PO (Post Office) Box rather than to their physical address. That’s the norm here. I have no idea why.

But having  PO Box address is good for work-at-home businesses, like myself. A friend of mine, who also works from home, initially put her physical address on her website and business card, and then had an unexpected visit from a client – whilst she was in her pyjamas! Oops! In this scenario, by using a PO Box address you can still build trust, but without having to worry about strangers seeing your PJs.

Extra tips for businesses whose premises are visited by clients…

If clients routinely visit your business, there are some extra things you should do:

  • Opening hours: You would be amazed at the number of physical retailers that don’t put their opening hours on their website. Craziness!
  • By appointment only: Don’t have set opening hours? Then tell readers that they are welcome to visit, but must make an appointment first. That way they know where they stand, and what to do.
  • Car parking information: Visiting a business can be stressful for people, especially if they’re not familiar with the area. It can also be incredibly frustrating to get somewhere and find out that there’s no parking available, or that they need change for the parking meter.
    • Visitor Parking: make it clear if you have Visitor Parking, and what the procedure is for parking there (for example, does the space need to be pre-booked?).
    • Other parking: If you don’t provide parking, tell readers where they can park, and if they need to pay for the parking, tell them what the payment methods are (e.g. cash, credit card, TXT-a-park, etc.). This is hugely valuable for people like me who never carry cash!
    • Time limits: Also, if there’s a time limit on the parking (e.g. 30 minutes, an hour, two hours), let people know. You’d be making a very big negative deposit into your customers’ emotional bank balances if they were to get a parking ticket, clamp or towed as a result of visiting your business!
  • Photograph of your building’s exterior: Makes it easy for prospects to find your business.
  • Map: Ditto! My preferred tool is Google Maps… not only is it free, but their maps are also interactive and let users get directions… very handy!
  • Directions: If your premises are difficult to find, include written directions as well.
  • Public transport links: If your customers take public transport to travel to you, include this information. E.g.: bus route(s), location of nearest bus stop or train station, etc.

5. Phone numbers

Yes, list all of your relevant phone numbers:

  • Land line
  • Cell phone
  • Fax
  • Skype username.

If there’s a specific number you’d prefer people to call you on (e.g. your cell phone, if you’re always out and about), then:

(a)  Put your preferred phone number at the top of the list.

(b)  Make your preferred phone number bold and stand out.

(c)  Make it clear that that’s your preferred number, e.g. by saying “this is the best number to call us on” next to it.

Also, if you prefer being contacted by phone than email, then put your phone number(s) nearer the top of the web page, and the email details below it.

(And likewise, if you prefer email contact, put your email address near the top of the page, and the phone numbers further down the page.)

6. Links to social media profiles

The Contact Us page is a good place to include links to your social media profiles:

  • Facebook Page
  • Twitter
  • LinkedIn
  • YouTube Channel
  • Pinterest
  • Anything else that you use!

Tip: set up these links to your social media profiles so that they open in a new web browser window (the HTML code for this is: target=_blank). This means that visitors won’t be taken away from your company website.

You could include your Facebook Feed or Twitter stream here, but that’s not essential.

7. Photographs of key contact people

Remember, the goal of the Contact Us page is to encourage prospects to contact you. And making your company look friendly and approachable will really help with that.

So be sure to include some staff photos on your Contact Us page. Photos help with trust building – and also help with building rapport.

If you have a Receptionist or Customer Services team, or other people who field most of the calls and enquiries, use their photos. A good caption to go with this kind of photo is:

“Mary Smith, our Receptionist, is the friendly voice you’ll first speak to when you call us.”

(The caption explains who the person is; and what their role is in the business.)

Or if you’re a one-person business, use your own photo and write a suitable caption.

8. Signature

Finally, end the page with your signature, name and credentials.

This helps with building trust – you can read all about using signatures for trust building here.

9. PS message with a final call-to-action

Is there a really important message you’d like to remind people of before they leave your site? Then include it in a “PS” message at the end.

PS messages do get read, and if people have scrolled to the bottom of your Contact Us page (and haven’t made contact), then point them towards some other useful content on your website. The person reading this message is likely to be a “Tentative Tom“, so your job is to give them all the information they need to spur them into contacting you.

Here are examples of the final call-to-action you could include in your PS message:

  • Testimonials page: Want to see what our customers are saying about us? Find out here
  • Newsletter sign-up: Get all the latest tips for free! 
  • Free quote: Contact us today for your free quote: call
  • Resources: Get the inside tips…

Pick just one message in your PS… if there’s more than one option, the reader will probably feel overwhelmed!

Summary

  • “Contact us” is the main call-to-action on many small business websites, yet many businesses throw these pages together quickly without much thought.
  • A good contact us page helps with conversions – and also helps to build rapport with your prospects.
  • Include the following when you write a Contact Us page for your website:
    1. Friendly introductory blurb
    2. Email address
    3. Contact form
    4. Physical and postal addresses
    5. Phone numbers
    6. Links to social media profiles
    7. Photographs of key contact people
    8. Signature
    9. PS message with a final call-to-action
  • If you have business premises that you want your customers and prospects to visit, also include:
    • Opening hours – or by appointment only
    • Car parking information: visitor parking, other parking, and any time limits
    • Photograph of your building’s exterior
    • Map
    • Directions
    • Public transport links

 

 

Why you shouldn’t ask prospects to ‘subscribe’ to your newsletter

If you want your email marketing to zoom along nicely, you shouldn't ask people to 'subscribe'. Discover why 'subscribe' is a poor choice of word - and what's a better alternative.

If you want your email marketing to zoom along nicely, you shouldn’t ask people to ‘subscribe’. Discover why ‘subscribe’ is a poor choice of word – and what’s a better alternative.

Why you shouldn’t ask prospects to ‘subscribe’ to your newsletter

Eh? That sounds crazy, right? Surely you’d want prospects to subscribe to your newsletter?

After all, my last article was all about how to get more email newsletter sign ups from your website.

Let me clarify: yes, you do want to grow your email list

While you want to grow your email opt-in list, you need to be very careful about how you ask people to do that.

Your choice of words has a big influence on how your readers will react to what you’re offering… and the word ‘subscribe’ is a big turn-off.

Why the word ‘subscribe’ is off-putting

As Derek Halpern points out in his article on Copyblogger, ‘subscribe’ has negative connotations for people.

You subscribe to magazines and newspapers: i.e. you pay money to receive these items.

You also subscribe to services such as internet plans, telecommunications, and so on.

Let’s look at how the Cambridge Dictionary defines the word subscribe:

  • to pay money to an organization in order to receive a product, use a service regularly or support the organization
    She subscribes to several women’s magazines.
    I subscribe £10 a month to the charity.
  • specialized to offer to buy something or pay an amount for something as part of your business activities
    Existing shareholders subscribed to only 49% of the new share issue.
(Definition of subscribe verb from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

Thus people to tend to equate the word ‘subscribe’ with expense, commitment, hassle… stuff they don’t want.

So how do you get people to sign up?

It’s simple: instead of using the word ‘subscribe’, you use the word ‘get’.

‘Get’ is a lot more casual. For example, people get a bottle of milk from the shop. They get a haircut. They get a present. Or get a hug.

We use the word ‘get’ freely, and it doesn’t imply commitment or hassle. (Even if it does sometimes cost money to ‘get’ something.)

Here’s are two of the definitions of ‘get’ in the Cambridge Dictionary:

  • to obtain, buy or earn something
    He’s gone down to the corner shop to get some milk.
    We stopped off on the motorway to get some breakfast.
    Where did you get your radio from?
  • to receive or be given something
    I got quite a surprise when I saw her with short hair.
    I got a (telephone) call from Phil last night.
    What did you get for your birthday?
(Definition of get verb (OBTAIN) from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

Does using the word ‘get’ really make a difference to newsletter sign up rates?

Apparently, yes, it does. Here’s an article on how one person improved their sign up rate by 254%.

Sure, that’s just one person, but I can see how that might work. People react very differently to certain words. So if I were you, I’d recommend that you tweak your website to use the word ‘get’ instead of ‘subscribe’. It’s a quick job, and one that could make a very big difference to your business!

Summary

Instead of asking people to ‘subscribe’ to your newsletter, ask them to ‘get’ your newsletter. Then test and measure to see what effect that has on your sign-up rates.

 

How to get more email newsletter sign ups on your website

The key to getting more email newsletter sign ups online is to appeal to both Tentative Tom and Decisive Dan.

The key to getting more email newsletter sign ups online is to appeal to both Tentative Tom and Decisive Dan.

One of the questions I get asked a lot by clients is, “how can I get more email newsletter sign ups on my website?”

The very first thing I do is to look at the client’s website to see if the sign up process will appeal to both Decisive Dan and Tentative Tom.

I’ve written about Decisive Dan and Tentative Tom before, and how they behave differently online. In previous articles you’ve seen how you need to take both user types into consideration when structuring your website content, and also when creating sales pages.

But you also need to take both of these website user types into consideration when you want more email newsletter sign ups.

Here’s how you can get both Decisive Dan and Tentative Tom to sign up to your email newsletter.

Both Decisive Dan and Tentative Tom need to be enticed to sign up

It seems that eeeeeveryone is offering email newsletters these days. And you have to earn (a) your place in prospects’ mailboxes, and (b) getting your newsletters read, rather than trashed.

How do you do that? With a free enticement of some sort. This freebie needs to be something that:

  • Recipients receive immediately. Instant gratification is key; if there’s a delay they’ll have forgotten about you. Therefore delivery needs to be automatic and automated (which is why email newsletter software such as AWeber and MailChimp is so neat, it does all that for you).
  • Is in some kind of digital format… after all, the computer will be delivering it for you. This digital file is something that people can either read, view, listen to or watch on their computers. It could be a written report; or an audio file; or a video… or for best effect, a mixture of these. (Why a mixture? Not everyone likes all formats – some people are visual, some are auditory, some are kinesthetic. The more people your offer appeals to, the wider the take up.)
  • Encourages foot traffic. Digital content isn’t suitable for all business types. Or you might want to do something a bit extra. For example, if you’re a retailer you might want to offer a digital “buyers’ guide” – but you might want to supplement that with a time limited offer to receive an in store consultation.
  • Adds value to what you do. The freebie should be something that helps to answer a problem that all your prospects share. It’s something that’ll help them in their lives, and establishes you as a credible expert.
  • Has enticing packaging. Packaging sells! Even though you’re sending something digital, get a graphic designer to make it look like a real product. There’s special software (for example Cover Action Pro PhotoShop add-on) that can mock up books, CDs, DVDs, magazines, and a whole lot more.
The business cards above aren’t real. Neither is the DVD case. Nor is the magazine. They’ve all been created by someone using Cover Action Pro.

The business cards above aren’t real. Neither is the DVD case. Nor is the magazine. They’ve all been created by someone using Cover Action Pro.

Both Decisive Dan and Tentative Tom will love this enticing packaging. There’s not much point in having a great freebie on offer, but it doesn’t look enticing. Give it some zing!

That’s where Dan and Tom’s similarities end… from now on, they want different things from your website. Yes, you can please them both – here’s how to do it! We’ll start with Decisive Dan…

Decisive Dan will want the minimum fuss and hoopla

To entice Decisive Dan to sign up to your newsletter, you need to make it easy for him. And the best way to do that is to have a sign up form right there, on most pages of your website.

(How do you get a sign up box onto your website? If you use an email newsletter system such as AWeber or MailChimp, it gives you a code that you or your website developer will need to add to your website.)

This sign up box should be in a prominent position, rather than tucked away somewhere down the bottom.

Very often, a Decisive Dan kind of person won’t scroll down the page, so you need to make it obvious!

How to make the sign up box obvious

A good way to make the sign up box obvious is to feature it prominently on every web page. My preferred space is at the very top of the right hand column (side bar), so that people can see the sign up box without having to scroll.

For example, on my own site, the sign up box appears at the top of the right hand column of most pages, as follows:

To attract as many email newsletter sign ups as possible, this box appears on most pages of my website.

To attract as many email newsletter sign ups as possible, this box appears on most pages of my website.

My sign-up box is quite subtle (I’m not into garish colours!).

But the email sign up box on this website, below, is brightly coloured to make it stand out:

You can spot the email sign up box on this website very easily! (Hint: it's the bright yellow box on the right.)

You can spot the email sign up box on this website very easily! (Hint: it’s the bright yellow box on the right.)

It’s not the prettiest looking website (or sign up box), but Randy Ingermanson has more than 30,000 email subscribers, so it definitely works for him!

Other techniques to get more email newsletter sign ups from Decisive Dan

There are other techniques you can use to grab Decisive Dan’s attention. These include pop-up boxes, which can be programmed to appear immediately when someone visits your site, or after a set amount of time.

I was happily starting to read a website article when this pop-up sign up box came up, blanking out the rest of the page. Many websites use this as a ploy to capture more email subscribers.

I was happily starting to read a website article when this pop-up sign up box came up, blanking out the rest of the page. Many websites use this as a ploy to capture more email subscribers.

Personally I don’t like these pop-up boxes, they really annoy me… though apparently they do work well. I don’t want to inflict them on my readers, seeing as I dislike these pop-ups myself!

But there’s a subtler way to grab Decisive Dan’s attention, and that’s with a Hello Bar.

The 'Hello Bar' is the bright horizontal strip across the top: this is an obvious but still subtle way to get users to take action, e.g. sign up to your email list.

The ‘Hello Bar’ is the bright horizontal strip across the top: this is an obvious but still subtle way to get users to take action, e.g. sign up to your email list.

The Hello Bar lets you use any call-to-action you like (be it a newsletter sign ups, or whatever). You can use colour to make it stand out, yet without being too garish. And it can stay at the top of the screen even when people scroll.

For example, here it is on my website:

The Hello Bar is visible at all times, even when people scroll down the web page.

The Hello Bar is visible at all times, even when people scroll down the web page.

I’m trialling the Hello Bar at the time of writing this; it’s early days yet, but it seems that my subscriber numbers have increased since I started using it. Yes, mine is quite subtle in colour, but garish colours aren’t for me. 😉

So there you have it: Decisive Dan wants it to be as easy as possible to sign up. He likes the sign up box to be attention-grabbing and with no excess information or blurb to hold him up.

What about Tentative Tom? Oooh, I’m glad you asked…

Tentative Tom will want more information before committing to signing up

That’s hardly surprising, that Tentative Tom wants more information before giving you his email address. He wants to:

  • Be assured that your newsletter is worth receiving – and including testimonials from other newsletter subscribers will help to sway him.
  • Get an idea of how often you’ll email him. Of course, you can change the frequency, but it’s nice for people to know if you’ll be emailing them daily, weekly, fortnightly, quarterly, etc.
  • Know that you won’t spam him, or use his details in an underhand way (e.g. sell or give the database to other people or organisations)
  • Be reassured that Unsubscribing will be easy, if he does change his mind
  • Want to know more about the freebie, to be sure he’ll like it (even though it is free!)

Wow, that’s rather a lot of information! Far too much to fit into your sign up box. That’s why it’s worth having an extra web page with more details.

Notice how I have a little link in the sign up box on my website?

The newsletter sign up box on the right-hand side bar of my website includes a link to web page with more information on my newsletter. This is for Tentative Tom!

The newsletter sign up box on the right-hand side bar of my website includes a link to web page with more information on my newsletter. This is for Tentative Tom!

That link is there especially so that Tentative Tom can find out everything he wants to know. The link goes to a special page that answers all his questions; gives some reader testimonials; – and yes, there’s another sign-up box there too.

Another benefit of having such a page is that you have a website address (URL) that you can link to easily, for example from other websites, or social media updates, and so on. In my case, I mostly point people towards http://wordsbycornelia.com/marketing-newsletter/

If you don’t have a special newsletter page, it’s harder to drive people to your site for the specific purpose of signing up. So there’s two-fold benefit for having this separate page: it encourages Tentative Tom to sign up, and you have a page that you can link to.

Anyway, here’s a visual of the web page that the link leads to:

This is my main email newsletter sign up page: it's a very good idea to have a dedicated page you can link to.

This is my main email newsletter sign up page: it’s a very good idea to have a dedicated page you can link to.

Notice how the sign up box is visible without scrolling; this is for Decisive Dan’s benefit, in case he ends up on this page.

If you scroll down, you’ll see the blurb that will answer Tentative Tom’s questions:

By scrolling down, Tentative Tom will be able to read more about the email newsletter subscription to put his mind at ease - and entice him to sign up!

By scrolling down, Tentative Tom will be able to read more about the email newsletter subscription to put his mind at ease – and entice him to sign up!

Sneaky bonus tip to get more email newsletter sign ups

I actually have two email newsletter sign up pages on my website. Notice how the one above talks (unsurprisingly) about the newsletter?

Well, sometimes I don’t want to promote the newsletter; I want to promote the free eGuide.

For example, the reverse of my business cards talks about the free eGuide. If I pointed these people towards the page above, they’d be confused, because the connection between the newsletter and free eGuide isn’t obvious at first glance. (Well, not to Decisive Dan, anyway.) Because the connection isn’t instantly obvious, it would make people scratch their head. And that’s dangerous, because while they’re scratching their head with their left hand, their right hand is hovering over the mouse to hit the ‘back’ button and navigate to some other website. Therefore we need to avoid that head scratching! And that where this second page makes a useful landing page.

So when I want to promote the free eGuide, I have a second (hidden) page, that only people with the link can find. It’s: http://wordsbycornelia.com/free/

It’s same-same but different to the other page, in that the prominent message is the free eGuide. Sure, it mentions the newsletter too (I don’t want to be misleading!), but the emphasis is different:

This sign up page has more emphasis on the free eGuide, than on the email newsletter. This makes it a useful landing page for when I'm promoting my eGuide.

This sign up page has more emphasis on the free eGuide, than on the email newsletter. This makes it a useful landing page for when I’m promoting my eGuide.

I’ve found it incredibly handy to have two different newsletter sign up pages, and I suggest that you do this too. You can even start measuring to see which page gets the best conversion rate, and learn from that.

Summary

There are many things you can do on your own website to increase the number of email newsletter sign ups:

  • Offer an incentive for signing up. And ensure that this incentive is
    • in digital format
    • delivered immediately
    • adds value to what your business does (it must appeal to all your prospects)
    • attractively packaged
  • Decisive Dan will want the sign up box positioned prominently on the website
  • Tentative Tom will want a detail page that gives him more information
  • Have two slightly different detail pages (one focusing on the newsletter; the other focusing on the incentive) give you extra flexibility in your marketing.
Once you’re sure that your website is set up to maximise email newsletter sign ups, your next task is to drive more traffic to your website so you can start growing your list in earnest.

 


Next step: like these website tips?

At last! Easy-to-read and plain-speaking tips to help you get to grips with your website.

At last! Easy-to-read and plain-speaking tips to help you get to grips with your website.

Then you’ll love the Website Owner’s Manual eBook I’ve written. It’s designed to rev up your website… and for less than the price of a tank of gas. It outlines in clear English:

  • Website updates: How often should you update your website? And what on earth could you possibly add to it?
  • Conversion: What tweaks could you make to your website to turn more visitors into customers?
  • Links: Why is it important to have quality websites linking to your website? And how can you go about getting these links?
  • Communication: How can you communicate with your customers online? And what sort of content could you use?
  • Measurement: What exactly should you be measuring? And how?
  • Real world strategies: What can you do in the real world to encourage people to visit your website?

Discover more about the Website Owner’s Manual eBook →

 

Does your website have Calls-To-Action suitable for both Decisive Dan and Tentative Tom?

To maximise your website's conversion rate, you must have calls-to-action that'll appeal to both Decisive Dan and Tentative Tom. Here's how to do it.

To maximise your website's conversion rate, you must have calls-to-action that'll appeal to both Decisive Dan and Tentative Tom. Here's how to do it.

Last time we looked at how Decisive Dan and Tentative Tom behave differently online.

Tentative Tom will want to read almost every page before making a purchasing decision.

Decisive Dan, on the other hand, wants to skip to the important stuff, and now!

How do you give both types of website users the information they need?

Let’s say you have a sales page of some kind on your website, and you want it to appeal to both Decisive Dan and Tentative Tom. This sales page could be for just about anything:

  • Your service that you sell (be it building, copywriting, beauty therapy, and so on).
  • Physical products, such as cosmetics, books, dog food, and so on.
  • Online products, such as eBooks, online courses, audio, and so on.

… in short, just about anything! We all have a sales page of some kind on our website (well, you should do anyway).

How would Tentative Tom read your sales page?

Tentative Tom will read everything on your sales page, and at least once. In fact, he’ll want all the information and then some more. For example:

  • For a service, he’d like to read reviews and testimonials, to see what other clients think.
  • For a product, he’d like reviews as well, but also an ingredients list.

Making Decisive Dan read through all this stuff would drive him nuts!

So how can you make your sales page appeal to both Decisive Dan and Tentative Tom?

Here’s how you can make a sales page appeal to both types of website users.

This assumes that you want to give Decisive Dan a quick and easy route; in my last article I gave some examples as to why you might not want to do this.

But in this instance, let’s assume you want to give your website wide appeal. Here’s how to do it.

1. Write a few paragraphs with the most pertinent information

These initial paragraphs will give Decisive Dan all the information he needs: just a short, sharp, concise summary.

Then give him a prominent call-to-action: which brings us to point number 2…

2. Provide multiple calls-to-action

Decisive Dan will want a prominent call-to-action (such as a “Buy Now” button) that’s easy to spot. This highly-visible button should show on your web page without him having to scroll to see it. (The technical term for this is “above the fold”.)

Here’s an example from MailChimp email newsletter software: there’s a big, prominent call-to-action button above the fold. Notice too how the button is in a bright, contrasting colour so that the call-to-action really stands out. That’s another technique that Decisive Dan will love.

It's easy to spot the brightly coloured call-to-action - you don't even need to scroll down the MailChimp web page to see it. (That's called being "above the fold".)

It's easy to spot the brightly-coloured call-to-action - you don't even need to scroll down the MailChimp web page to see it. (Content that's visible without scrolling is called "above the fold".)

But do you see what else they’ve done? Right underneath the button there’s a hyperlink, “Need convincing?” Here’s a close-up:

.Here's a close-up of that above the fold call-to-action. Notice the link underneath the "Sign Up Free" button? That's there for Tentative Tom!

Here's a close-up of that above the fold call-to-action. Notice the link underneath the "Sign Up Free" button? That's there for Tentative Tom!

 

Tentative Tom will be very happy about this link, because it will take him to a long and detailed “Why MailChimp?” page:

Tentative Tom will love this long and detailed sales page!

Tentative Tom will love this long and detailed sales page!

 

Best of all, at the bottom of the page there’s another prominent call-to-action. This is vital; you don’t want website visitors reaching the bottom of the page and then wondering what to do next, and deciding if it’s worth scrolling back up to the top. You need to give them a prominent call-to-action there and then.

 

It's vital that there's a call-to-action at the foot of every web page. You should never leave your website visitors wondering where to go next!

It's vital that there's a call-to-action at the foot of every web page. You should never leave your website visitors wondering where to go next!

 

What’s super cool about this MailChimp example is that there’s another, more subtle, call-to-action underneath for the Tentative Tom who is still in research mode. They’ve made it easy for him to read the testimonials.

Every single page on your website should have a call-to-action:

  • Above the fold (if you want to attract the Decisive Dan type of person); and
  • At the bottom of the page. Even Decisive Dan will be frustrated if he scrolls down and doesn’t know where to go next!

3. Provide your contact details in case of questions

Think that your job’s done there? Nope, not quite yet.

Chances are that Tentative Tom might still have some more questions lurking in his mind, so encourage him to contact you. Provide your email address, so that Tentative Tom can easily get in touch with any questions.

Even if he doesn’t get in touch with you, Tentative Tom will be reassured by the very fact that your email address is there. It makes your business look real, genuine, helpful.

Decisive Dan will appreciate having your contact information on hand too. For his benefit, you should put your contact details on each web page (for example in the header or footer) so he doesn’t have to go searching for it.

Hint: Even if you have a contact form, you should still include your email address. Here’s why.

Wow, that’s a mighty long web page – is there any way I can shorten it?

If the thought of such a long page makes you shudder, here’s how you can shorten it. It’s a technique used by many ecommerce websites. And that is to use “tabs” for the information, like this:

This product sales page has clickable tabs, instead of presenting the information in a long, linear format.

This product sales page has clickable tabs, instead of presenting the information in a long, linear format.

This means that all the information is there, but without a long sales page… what a great way to keep both Decisive Dan and Tentative Tom happy!

And if you can keep all types of website users happy, your website’s conversion rates will be maximised.

Summary

To encourage both Decisive Dan and Tentative Tom to take action online, your website should provide:

  • A short summary of what you do (for Decisive Dan’s benefit).
  • A prominent call-to-action above the fold (for Decisive Dan’s benefit).
  • Detailed information on your product or service, either on the same page or using tabs. And link to other pages when necessary. (This is for Tentative Tom’s benefit.)
  • A prominent call-to-action at the foot of every web page. (This is for everyone’s benefit.)
  • Full contact details, including your email address, on every page of your website. Again, this is for everyone’s benefit.

 

How to make your website appeal to both Decisive Dan and Tentative Tom

How to deal with different customer types online: Decisive Dan and Tentative Tom want very different things from your website!

How to deal with different customer types online: Decisive Dan and Tentative Tom want very different things from your website!

Have you noticed how some folks like to take the motorway (or highway, or freeway, or Autobahn, or whatever you call it in your country)?

They just want to get to their destination as quickly as possible, no messing around.

Yet other people will avoid the motorway as much as possible. They prefer the meandering back roads, where they can enjoy views of fields of cattle. Or admire the flowers in the gardens of the cottages lining the streets. For these people, the journey is there to be savoured and enjoyed, rather than merely tolerated.

Your website visitors are similar

You’ll get some website visitors who just want to get to the information quickety-quick, thank you very much. They want the whole experience to be speedy and with minimum fuss. If they like what’s on offer, they’ll want to buy from you right away; they’ll make a quick, snap decision based on what’s in front of them. This is a Decisive Dan kind of person.

But here’s the thing: not everyone’s a Decisive Dan

Many people like to think about things a little longer, and will often read every page on your website before taking action. Even then, they may just sign up for your email newsletter rather than actually buying anything… they want to suss you out first.

That is a Tentative Tom kind of person

Decisive Dan and Tentative Toms are two extremes; but the extremes do exist. And for your website to have the broadest possible appeal, it needs to address the needs of both Decisive Dan and Tentative Tom, and that’s not always so easy.

The problem is that your own style of buying behaviour is probably reflected in your website

For example, if you’re a Decisive Dan, chances are your website will be brief to the point of being abrupt. There won’t be many pages on the site; and each page might have just a paragraph or two of content.

A Tentative Tom business owner will have quite a different website: expect lots of pages, with lots of copy on each page. (Assuming, that is, they’ve been able to make a decision about their website… maybe they don’t have a website at all, because they’re still deciding!) 😉

You need to wear the opposite shoes for your website to be successful

To get maximum results online, your website will need to address the needs of both Decisive Dan and Tentative Tom. After all, if you don’t, you’ll be losing out on a significant number of prospects.

Therefore if you’re a Decisive Dan, you need to look at your website through the eyes of a Tentative Tom. That means putting yourself in their shoes to see what your website might be missing.

Not sure what on earth these frustratingly hesitant and dithering people might want?

Let’s be clear: Tentative Tom has money to spend, and is researching your industry to find his perfect supplier. But he is looking for total reassurance that your product or service will meet their needs. And it’s up to you to (and your website) to convince him to spend.

Tentative Tom has money to spend too: you just need to work a bit harder to convince him to spend it with you.

Tentative Tom has money to spend too: you just need to work a bit harder to convince him to spend it with you.

Here are the kinds of things Tentative Tom will look for on your website:

  • About Us page: Your About Us page should include personal bios of key staff, ideally with photos alongside them. Tentative Tom wants to know that he’s doing business with real people (and a real company) and not some kind of scam set up.
  • Full contact details: Another way to show Tentative Tom that your business is ‘real’ is to include full contact details. That means a landline phone number, address, and email address as a minimum. Personally, I will not buy from a site that only has an email address or a cell phone number… it’s too risky!
  • Guarantee: A risk-reversal mechanism of some kind. The Tentative Tom doesn’t want to take you up on the guarantee; what he’s looking for is that you stand by your own products. A lack of guarantee will deemed to be suspicious – especially if your competitors are prepared to offer a risk-reversal mechanism such as a guarantee. It’s also important that your guarantee appears genuine, rather than vague. Therefore you should outline exactly how the guarantee works; any conditions; and what the guarantee procedure is.
  • Testimonials: Tentative Tom wants to be sure that you have other happy customers. It’s not enough to have a Testimonials page; these testimonials must be believable. The best testimonials will directly tackle the major objections people have to your product or service. And adding a photograph of the testimonial giver makes their statement far more plausible.
  • Case studies: A good case study will go deeper than a testimonial, as it outlines the problem (the “before” situation); the solution (the “after” result); and the specific steps taken to achieve these results. The more specific you can be, the better: just be sure you have your client’s permission to share their information. And make sure you do use your own case studies (or “before and afters”) rather than generic ones; your own stories will have much more impact.
  • Good amount of detail on products/services: Tentative Tom will want to know exactly what he’s buying – so be sure to spell it out in some details. Provide photos or other graphics where possible, for added authenticity.
  • Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) page: A good way to give Tentative Tom all the information he needs (but without cluttering up your product/service pages too much) is to provide an FAQs page – or even a number of FAQs pages. (For example, an FAQs page for each different product or service.) These pages are a great idea anyway, as they can cut down the amount of time you spend answering the same questions over and over: they are great time savers!
  • Value-added information: Things like informational articles and videos go a long way in demonstrating your expertise in your industry. It shows that you really know your stuff, and elevates your status versus your competitors who aren’t doing this. You can put this kind of info into a Blog, or else have a section called Resources or Articles. (Use whatever terminology you’re comfortable with, and that will resonate with your customers.)
  • The buying process: How do people buy from you? Don’t just assume it’s obvious, especially if you’re a service-based business. Have a dedicated page called “The Process” or “How it Works” and outline the steps of the buying process. That way, Tentative Tom will begin to picture himself taking these steps.
  • E-commerce sites: If you have an e-commerce website, be sure to have a page called “Customer Service” (or similar) with detailed shipping and returns information.
  • Invite contact: Make it easy for people to contact you on your website. Tentative Tom will often have a pre-purchase question; and the speed and tone of your reply will impact greatly on whether he buys from you or not.

Daunted by that list? You shouldn’t be; a professional website from a professionally-run business should have these things as standard.

Remember, it’s all about conversion: if you want your website to convert visitors into customers, you need to give your prospects all the information they need before they buy.

But what about Decisive Dan? How to make a website appeal to him?

Decisive Dan is a different beast altogether. The thought of having to read long pages of blurb will make Dan perspire with anxiety!

There are two ways you can handle Decisive Dan:

1. Make it easy for Decisive Dan to reach his destination

Just like the motorway-lover will keep an eye out for road signs leading them to the motorway, you can give Decisive Dan cues on where to go. That means letting him skip through the information, so he can get to his destination more quickly. There will be some specific tips on how to do that in the next article in this mini-series.

2. Force Decisive Dan to read through everything

Yep, in some instances you might want to force Decisive Dan to read everything, regardless. And that’s very much the approach I take on my website: the sales pages for my marketing eBooks are long. And the information on my Services is just as long.

Why? It prevents misunderstandings further down the track. Let me explain, by showing you two examples from my own business:

eBooks

I want people to know exactly what they’re buying upfront. That way, they will be happy with their eBook purchase, and more likely to recommend me to their friends and colleagues. It is a good way of keeping refunds to a minimum, and maximising customer satisfaction. It’s important to me to have happy customers who get value from my materials.

Services

Buying an eBook is a pretty low level of commitment compared to engaging my marketing consulting or website copywriting services. Before people contact me, it’s vital that they understand what I do, how I work, and how I can help them. I want them to be sure that I’m the right kind of person to work with them. The people who do not read my Services sales pages are invariably the people who turn into ‘problem’ customers, and who ask me to perform tasks that are not within my area of expertise. (It doesn’t help that “marketing” is such a vague term, so the expectations can vary significantly.) This ends up being frustrating for both the customer and for me, so I’d rather not get into that situation in the first place.

I now do my best to “force” people to read my Sales page. How? I ask them if they want the Basic or Premium option. (Most services have these two choices.) And the information on the Basic or Premium packages is right at the bottom of the sales page, so they have to read (or at least skim read) the whole page to find it.)

In short: I’ve set up my website so it selects-in the right kind of customer, and it selects-out the customers I’d probably clash with.

It’s all about creating a website process that achieves your business goals

As you might have gathered from these examples, I am very much a Tentative Tom, and I’ve adopted a well-thought-out technique to deal with my opposite, Decisive Dan. It really works well for me; it’s a system I’ve been testing and fine-tuning for a number of years now.

But that’s just me: for many businesses it makes sense to appeal to both Decisive Dan and Tentative Tom, or they’re missing out on valuable sales. So if you’re wondering how your website can perform better for your business, remember to think about your opposite personality type, and how want to deal with them.

And whether you mull this over as you’re zooming down the motorway or meandering through back-country lanes… well, that’s completely up to you!

Summary

  • To maximise your website’s effectiveness, it should appeal to all kinds of decision makers:
    • Decisive Dan makes quick, snap decisions with minimum fuss.
    • Tentative Tom will read all the small print and details before making contact.
  • Tentative Tom will want to see the following on your website:
    • About us page
    • Full contact details
    • Guarantee
    • Testimonials
    • Case studies
    • Detailed information on products/services
    • Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) page
    • Value-added information via a Blog, or else a Resources or Articles section on your website
    • Explanation of the buying process
    • Customer service page on e-commerce sites with Delivery and Returns information
    • Easy ways to contact you if there are any queries or questions.
  • Decisive Dan will want to be shown the quickest route possible to buy from you… and that’ll be covered in more detail next time.

Your quick, 10-step guide to building trust online

Getting your readers to trust (and like) your website straightaway is vital.

Getting your readers to trust (and like) your website straightaway is vital.

When prospects visit your website, they will decide within 7 short seconds whether they want to explore your site further – or if they’ll hit the “back” button and look at a competitors’ site.

A big factor in whether they hang around (or not) comes down to trust: but how do you do that in such a short space of time?

Here are the top ten ways in which you can build trust online:

  1. Full contact details: include ALL your contact details – landline number, mobile number, postal address, physical address and email address.
  2. About us page: this is a vital trust-building page, and should include details of key people within the company (with photos).
  3. Memberships and associations: using logos of organisations you’re a member of (assuming you have their permission) is a quick visual way of building trust and credibility. This includes membership of business groups such as BNI and Chambers of Commerce, as well as any industry-specific associations.
  4. Professional website design: because professional companies need to look professional online. This is about having web pages that are well laid-out, and with an appropriate colour scheme and fonts.
  5. Professional logo design: your company’s logo should appear on the site, so make sure your logo has been professionally-designed. A poorly-designed or dated logo doesn’t help with building trust.
  6. Professional photographs: it’s not unusual to see small business websites that are generally quite decent, but then ruined with amateurish photography.
  7. Well-written content, with correct spelling, punctuation and grammar: when people look at a website, all they can judge your business on is based on what’s in front of them. So the smallest details take on a big significance… and that includes the accuracy of the writing.
  8. Testimonials: client testimonials are a vital tool in building trust. Make sure your website has a top-level page dedicated to testimonials.
  9. Up-to-date content: have you ever looked at a website, and wondered if it’s up-to-date? Don’t let this kind of doubt creep into prospects’ minds. A quick way of communicating that your site is current is via the copyright details in the footer of each page. For example:
    Copyright © ABC Company 1995 – 2012.
    This quickly tells readers that (a) you’ve been in business for a while, and (b) that your site is up-to-date. How easy is that?!
  10. Easy-to-use and logical navigation: make sure your site is easy to navigate. If your website is confusing to use, it may frustrate users and affect your company’s credibility online.

 

What’s best: a contact form or email address?

It's vital that a website's Contact Us page makes it easy for prospects to contact you.

It’s vital that a website’s Contact Us page makes it easy for prospects to contact you.

You’re working on your website, and you’re umming and ahhing about what to put on your Contact Us page. Should you use an enquiry form, or your email address – or both?

Let’s look at this from your prospects’ point of view

Why are they looking at your Contact page?

Um, probably because they want to get in touch with you, right? So it makes sense to encourage them to do just that, by making it as easy as possible for the customer to connect.

So what makes it easy for the customer to connect?

Well, that can vary from person to person. Let’s look at both contact forms and email addresses…

The case for and against contact forms

Contact forms (or enquiry forms) make it super-easy for customers to get in touch. Readers don’t have to launch their email software; they can easily just type in the info, click “submit” and bingo!

But contact forms aren’t perfect. Have you ever had the experience of filling in a contact form, and never hearing back from the company? And you don’t have a record of what you’ve just sent them, to follow them up?

Frustrating, isn’t it?

And most people will have had a frustrating experience with enquiry forms

Sometimes the frustration might be around the contact form asking you to select why you’re contacting them; and then a sub-menu pops up.

And the darn form won’t send until you’ve worked your way through all these “compulsory” boxes. Yet so often, none of the options seem to apply to you!

Another common frustration with enquiry forms is that you click “submit” and the message disappears into the ether. Often you have no record of what you said; and so often you never hear back from the company you’ve emailed.

If you want to use an enquiry form on your website, a simple (and very customer-friendly) thing to do is to add some words along the lines of:

Please contact us by filling in your details here – you can expect to receive a reply from our friendly team within 2 working days. If you don’t hear back from us by then, it means that something’s gone astray, so please give us a call on 123 456 as your enquiry is important to us.

That should encourage your prospects to submit their info.

The case for and against email addresses

The frustrations with contact forms give the benefits of including your email address: there are no drop-down menus; and you have a record of your message in your Sent Items folder.

The biggest reason you’ll hear for NOT including your email address, is that spambots might harvest your address and you’ll get bombarded with spam.

Um, what would you rather do: delete some spam emails, or miss out on an enquiry that could be worth thousands of dollars?

Most business owners quite happily put up with a bit of spam to ensure they’re not missing out on sales. After all, we’re in business to make sales! It makes no sense at all to miss out on enquiries by not including your email address.

And if you’re really that worried about spam, invest in a spam filter. If your email service provider doesn’t offer one, then look around for an add-on service – or change providers.

Summary

1. Make the contact form as simple as possible; don’t clutter it with lots of drop-down menus and other “compulsory” boxes.

2. Ideally, include an email address AND an enquiry form for ultimate customer-friendliness.

3. Put some friendly words alongside the enquiry form, to let prospects know how soon they can expect a reply, and what they should do if they don’t hear back within that time frame.

4. If you’re worried about spam, invest in a spam filter.

… In short, the most customer-friendly solution is to provide both an enquiry form AND an email address. That’s what’ll maximise your enquiry rate.

 

Are you using this little-known online trust building technique?

Imagine you’re looking for something online. You find a promising link on Google and click through to a company’s website. You quickly skim-read the home page and scroll right down to the bottom.

But uh-oh! You’ve just seen the Copyright date! And it says 2006! Immediately your alarm bells ring: is this company still in business? Is their website up-to-date?

All of a sudden, you’re not sure about the professionalism of this business, and you go back to Google to find an alternative supplier.

This example might sound extreme, but it’s surprisingly common online behaviour

When we’re evaluating a new supplier, and all we know of them is their website, every little element has an important role. And that includes the Copyright date in the footer.

You may not even have noticed this Copyright date before

If you haven’t noticed it, have a look at some websites, and scroll right down to the very bottom. There you’ll see some information, probably in a very small-sized font, along the lines of:

Copyright © XYZ Company Limited 2005 – 2012

The purpose of this information is to protect the company’s copyright of the content (i.e. they are asserting that the content is theirs, and that it is illegal to copy it). Copyright law applies internationally.

But this article isn’t about law, it’s about online trust building. So look at that example above again, and you’ll notice that there’s a date range.

What does this date range tell you?

The date range tells you two things:

  1. The business has been online since 2005, so the business itself has been around for a number of years. They’re therefore unlikely to be a “fly by night” operation.
  2. The last date is the current year. That means that they’ve probably updated their website recently, which indicates that the information on the website is up-to-date. Moreover, it tells you that the company pays attention to detail and is professional in its dealings.

Of course, that’s a big assumption to make

But it’s a very powerful assumption… and all from one little innocuous sentence at the bottom. It’s a small but very important (and easy) trust-building tool. And it’s one that you should be using.

 

Is your negative language turning prospects away?

It's not just dogs that don't understand negative commands - neither do your prospects.

It’s not just dogs that don’t understand negative commands – neither do your prospects.

Imagine that you’re visiting a dog obedience class. And you tell one of the well-trained pooches, “don’t sit!”

What does the dog do? Chances are it will sit. Even though you’ve told it not to.

You see, dogs don’t understand negatives in front of commands. They just hear the command.

The human subconscious brain is just the same

Even though our ears hear the negative language (or our eyes read it), our brains don’t register the negative message either, just like the dog obedience class story.

For example, I were to tell you NOT to think of a bouquet of beautiful, luscious red roses, what are you visualising?

Most likely you are thinking of a bouquet of red roses, even though I explicitly told you NOT to think of them!

Your prospects and clients are much the same

Just like your brain doesn’t really register the negative language, neither do your clients and prospects. Yet it is very common to see negatives being used in business communications. Everything from websites, sales letters and emails will say things like:

“Don’t forget to take us up on this offer.”

“Don’t hesitate to contact me.”

These communications may as well be saying “forget about this offer”, and “hesitate to contact me”. Because subliminally, that’s what the readers will be picking up on.

Be bold!

Instead of negative language and wishy-washy phrases, be bold! Tell your readers what you really want them to do!

“Be sure to take us up on this offer.”

“I’d love to hear from you!”

This may seem a very minor tweak to make to your copywriting, but it’s a powerful one.

You see, this kind of positive language makes your team – and your company as a whole – sound more positive, confident and professional.

So make it your company policy to use nothing but positive language in your marketing materials and chances are you’ll get more positive results too.

 

How to make your business friendly

Could your business be scaring customers awayHave you ever looked up a company and:

  • There’s no map on their website, nor opening times. Anyway, you hop in your car and hope for the best…
  • You look up the address: you reckon you should be in the right place because your trusty map (or GPS unit) got you there… yet there is no street number marked on the building.
  • You can’t find anywhere to park? All the spaces are either reserved, full, or threatening a tow-away… and every single on-street space is full too. So maybe you end up parking half a block away in a dodgy looking side-street and pray that your car (and its contents) will still be there later.
  • You’re not sure which building is the right one? There are no signs or any other indication as to where you should be going.
  • On closer inspection, you can’t even find an entrance door? So you then pluck up the courage to ask in another office, and the snotty receptionist gives you some half-baked directions which you don’t quite understand (probably because she’s just made them up).
  • You’ve now found the door, found which floor you’re meant to be on, arrive there… but the door is locked/unmarked/etc.? (One time I took the stairs, simply because I prefer stairs to elevators, only to find that they led to a fire escape door which was locked… so I had to walk all the way back down and THEN take the lift! It was a hot, humid Auckland day and I was rather clammy by the time I found the reception area!)
  • Eventually find where you’re meant to be, but are later than planned, hot, sweaty, in a bad mood, grumpy, etc?

I’m sure we’ve all had frustrating experiences like this to some degree

Just imagine how hard the sales staff will have to work just to get you feeling at ease and happy to be there. They’ll be starting on the back-foot right from the outset!

Personally, my heart sinks when I visit a business like this. I figure they may as well go home, not bother. If they care that little about the customer, why should I spend my money with them?

The business doesn’t seem friendly (nor customer-friendly) – so why should I do business with them?

Sadly this scenario is fairly common – and yet so easy to fix. Here are my pointers for companies who rely on customers (and suppliers) visiting them:

1. Have a “contact us” page on your website

On said web page, include:

  • All your contact details – including the physical address.
  • A map of your location. This is soooo easy using Google Maps – and free!
  • Your opening hours.
  • Car parking details. If there are reserved spaces, mention where they are: and if you know full well that they’re nearly always taken, suggest where the best alternative parking spot is. If it’s pay-and-display, let your customers know if they’ll need cash or if they can pay with their cell phone or credit card. Better still, give them the coins or refund them their money.
  • A photo of the outside of your building – this will help people to find your business.
  • Any other directions or instructions that will help your clients.

2. Invest in signage

Invest in as much signage as is necessary – don’t be tempted to skimp. Make it easy and obvious for customers to find your business – and if you find they often go the wrong way, do something about it! Be proactive!

In some cases, a simple self-printed and laminated page is better than nothing. Yet nothing is often all you see… that’s just lazy!

Hint: if you do go for the DIY option, be sure to replace it regularly because paper does fade, get crumpled, rain-damaged etc. A dog-eared bit of paper is not a professional look.

Oh, and if your address includes a street number, please please display that street number somewhere on your building or shop-front.

Remember – there’s no such thing as making your business too easy to find!

Summary

A stressed out customer won’t feel too get about spending money with an unfriendly business.

Chances are you may not see them again, and the stories they’ll be telling their friends will be about what a nightmare they had finding your business, rather than raving about the excellent products or services on offer.